×
36 690
Fashion Jobs
ALICE AND OLIVIA
Sales Supervisor - Austin
Permanent · Austin
ALICE AND OLIVIA
E-Commerce Customer Service Manager
Permanent · New York
JCPENNEY
Business Support Specialist - Communications
Permanent · Plano
JCPENNEY
Buyer - Home (Entertaining & Tabletop)
Permanent · Plano
JCPENNEY
Multi District Human Resources Business Partner
Permanent · Jefferson City
JCPENNEY
Product Manager - Customer Account & Loyalty
Permanent · Plano
TIFFANY & CO
Inventory Control Analyst
Permanent · Parsippany-Troy Hills
ULTA BEAUTY
Salon Manager-Hickory Point Mall
Permanent · Forsyth
ULTA BEAUTY
Salon Manager-White Marlin Mall
Permanent · Ocean City
ULTA BEAUTY
Prestige Sales Manager-Friendly Hills Marketplace
Permanent · Whittier
ULTA BEAUTY
Salon Manager-Pelican Plaza
Permanent · Sarasota
ULTA BEAUTY
Store Operations Program Manager - Strategic Initiatives
Permanent · Bolingbrook
ULTA BEAUTY
Retail Operations Manager-Fischer Marketplace Shopping Center
Permanent · Apple Valley
ULTA BEAUTY
Retail Sales Manager - Market Street Flowood
Permanent · Flowood
ULTA BEAUTY
Salon Manager-Walnut Square Shopping Center
Permanent · Dalton
ULTA BEAUTY
General Manager-Coolsprings Galleria
Permanent · Franklin
ULTA BEAUTY
Salon Manager-Poplar Creek Crossing
Permanent · Hoffman Estates
ULTA BEAUTY
District Manager-San Francisco East
Permanent · San Francisco
BANANA REPUBLIC
General Manager - Willowbend Mall
Permanent · Plano
GUESS
Account Executive
Permanent · New York
GUESS
IT Project Manager
Permanent · Los Angeles
GUESS
Senior Financial Analyst
Permanent · Los Angeles

Roland Mouret from 'Me Too' to Laura Mars

Published
today Feb 18, 2018
Reading time
access_time 2 minutes
Share
Download
Download the article
Print
Click here to print
Text size
aA+ aA-

The 'Me Too' movement has rippled through this whole fashion season, and on Sunday morning informed the latest collection of Roland Mouret, albeit distilled through references to an iconic 70s movie.


Roland Mouret - Fall 2018 - Instagram


The Eyes of Laura Mars, starring Faye Dunaway as a fashion photographer living on the Upper East who is brutally stalked, informed the clothes. From the baroque jacquard capes and velvet corduroy pants to the Prince of Wales mannish tailoring and the exposed-seam alpaca capes.
 
“As a fashion designer that film is our bible. I never wanted to touch it but this year the meaning of the movie is so relevant in this time of the sexualization of women for power,” opined Mouret, Sunday morning in his backstage, after taking plaudits from Arizona Muse, Daisy Lowe and Caitriona Balfe.

Presented on a maze-like catwalk inside the Royal National Theatre, inside another monument to the 70s, the new Brutalist South Bank on the Thames. 
 
Mouret certainly took his oeuvre somewhere new – with stretch chevron lace tops and baroque skirts. His clothes were empowering, and quite a few steps from his signature, scalpel-cut, sculpted cocktail hour dresses that models look like they are poured into.
 
More controversially, Mouret addressed the whole issue of sexual harassment in the fashion industry. One he can consider from several sides, seeing as this French-born designer was a male model in his early days. Later on Sunday, almost a score of female British film stars were due to stand together, each dressed in black, on Bafta’s red carpet outside London’s Royal Albert Hall, many accompanied by feminist activists rather than by their partners.
 
However, Mouret warned against a rapid rush to judgment of any individual.
 
“We are living in a world where people are guilty on Instagram before being judged. We are burning photographers like medieval witches. Normally you are innocent until proven guilty. Now it is the exact opposite. That’s why this film is relevant. As, the 1970s marks the beginning of the liberation of women. We are destroying people by pointing and judging… I was a model in Milan in the 80s so I think I know how certain things unfortunately worked in the industry.  Still, to me, people are being attacked today and being accused because of the fact they worked successfully in fashion for 20 years, so you must have done something wrong. The end of this issue is equality, which is right, but the means sometimes are not,” concluded the designer.

Copyright © 2019 FashionNetwork.com All rights reserved.